A new massive cruise terminal is opening in Florida

Port Canaveral is building a new cruise terminal to meet the growing demands of the cruise industry.

The strategic decision to build a new multi-user cruise terminal at the Port’s existing North 8 berth provides significant cost savings, operational flexibility, and an expedited construction timeline of approximately two years to accommodate the largest ships in the world across a spectrum of brands.

Port Canaveral’s existing North 8 berth shares its basin with the Port’s Cruise Terminal 5 on the northside of Port Canaveral. Designed and built in 2018 for multi-purpose flexibility, North 8 berth will require minimal modifications to extend the current 1,020 linear feet bulkhead to 1,344 feet to accommodate large cruise vessels. Additionally, waterside improvements to the northside of the shared basin will also extend and improve the berthing capacity of Cruise Terminal 5.

Timeline for design, engineering, and construction are in development with target completion for the new facility by summer 2026. The new terminal campus will include a multi-story parking facility to accommodate up to 3,000 vehicles and roadway improvements in and out of the new facility, including turning lanes and a “flyover” ramp directly connecting the site with State Road 401.

Meet the fifth generation Hawaiian family who are changing chocolate

“I’d like to introduce you to a dear friend of mine. He’s very intelligent, he’s highly evolved, he’s handsome and delicious and very shy,” tour guide Alexandria Webster said mischievously.

“Friends, this is Theo.”

Partially expecting an eligible bachelor to come sauntering around the foliage of the 46-acre Lydgate Farms in Kapaa, Kaua’i, we quickly learn that Theo is short for Theobroma cacao. Alas, not a heartthrob, but a tropical evergreen tree known for its seeds that are used to produce cocoa powder and chocolate, whose scientific name means ‘food of the gods’ in Greek.

“This mood-elevating food was discovered by the ancient Aztecs and Mayans and back then they weren’t nibbling on Hershey,” she says. “They were consuming chocolate as a ceremonial health chocolate tonic beverage and it was fermented cocoa beans with some spices like cinnamon, cardamon, vanilla bean and some hot chilli peppers. If you were drinking it you were likely a monarch or a priest because you were consuming money. This is what they would trade as their currency.”

A superfood with super qualities

On a mission to change the way people think about chocolate, Webster says many visitors who come to the farm don’t know that chocolate is a fruit.

“It’s not just a fruit, it’s a superfood. Cacao is loaded with vitamins, trace minerals, hundreds of them, it’s one of the highest whole food sources of antioxidants that you can consume. It contains over forty mood-elevating properties,” she said. 

Over the centuries, this beverage was used to treat anemia, mental fatigue, tuberculosis, fever, gout, kidney stones, and even poor sexual appetite. While most of the chocolate of today no longer has health benefits, top-of-the line fine chocolates do.

“It only takes one ounce of quality chocolate a day to reap the benefits of heart health, brain health,” she says. “It’s great for your blood circulation, it’s going to open up your vessels, it’s going to improve your mood, your alertness because of the theobromine in chocolate. So, if you eat chocolate every day, you will not only be happier, you’re going to die a little less. It’s shown to lower all-cause mortality.”

Regenerative, generational farming

Lydgate Farms is run by Will Lydgate, whose family legacy on Kaua’i can be traced back across five generations. “My great-grandfather William arrived in 1865 with a dream to help build the future of the Hawaiian Kingdom,” he says. “[I’ve] dedicated myself to building a team that grows the best cacao the world has ever tasted.”

Embodying the principle of Mālama ‘Āina, a Hawaiian word that means to care for and honour the land for future generations, sustainability is at the forefront of his efforts. In addition to producing single-estate chocolate and treats like chocolate-covered macadamia nuts, Lydgate Farms also offers vanilla beans and small-batched palm blossom honey. 

“This beautiful tropical diverse farm is cultivated in a regenerative fashion, meaning we’re reinvesting in the soil for generations to come,” says Webster, adding that honey tasting is now part of the tour. “Cacao is an equatorial fruit — it only grows about 20° of the equator. That actually makes Hawai’i the only place in the continental US that can commercially grow chocolate.”

The farm has been recognized multiple times for producing some of the best chocolate in the world at international competitions. “Our farm represents the United States of America at the Cocoa of Excellence Awards in Paris. This is a world-wide chocolate competition every two years. Our humble farm is like the Jamaican bobsled team of the chocolate world, the underdogs,” she says, referencing the cult-favourite movie Cool Runnings. “Forty-six acres is a drop in the bucket compared to Ecuador, Peru, Costa Rica, they have thousands of acres and they’ve been doing it way longer than us. Small but mighty, we are now three consecutive runnings of the 50 best tasting chocolates in the whole world.”

From bean to bar

Based solely on the terroir of the farm, chocolate bars can elicit different flavour profiles from fruits to earthy tones. While there are only 14 original families of cacao, they cross pollinate to create thousands of varietals and result in the various coloured pods that range from yellow to vibrant red.

“Chocolate that’s fermented, that has distinctive flavour, that is packed with health benefits, and is not confectionery — meaning it’s heavily diluted with milk and sugar — didn’t even exist until 1997,” she says. “Isn’t that wild? It hasn’t been that long. People are just starting to learn about the art and the science that goes into making fine chocolate. Because Hawai’i is the only state where it can be commercially grown, we’re trying to transform Kaua’i into the Napa Valley of the chocolate world.”

At US$18 a pop, a chocolate bar from Lydgate Farms comes with a heftier price tag than your typical store-bought Cadbury bar. But when you consider the process involved, it should be a lot steeper. “If I crack this seed open and plant a seed today, it takes the tree at least four to five years to start bearing mature fruit. At that age, cocoa blossoms will start to bloom. They are so small that they are not pollinated by bees. They’re pollinated by the midge, which is a type of gnat,” she says. “Then it takes six to eight months for them to mature. A cacao tree can live 50 to 100 years.”

When it’s all said and done, she said the journey from bean to bar takes six to seven years. “Chocolate has more intricacies, more terroir, more flavour markers than wine,” she says. 

This story first appeared in the Spring 2024 issue of OFFSHORE. To read the full story, click here

 

A glamping retreat with a country store just opened in Texas

Outdoorsy Hill Country is a new luxury glamping retreat set in Hill Country, Texas.

Surrounded by rolling hills, the retreat, set on 32 acres, offers guests access to 22 all-season canvas glamping tents, a cafe and bar, a country store, an events lodge and a network of trails through nearby Fredericksburg. 

A large spring-fed watering hole is a centerpiece of the property, and offers a perfect spot for summer paddleboarding and wildlife spotting. Across the property, live oaks provide shade for live music performances and an outdoor bar.

Outdoorsy Hill Country combines state-of-the-art safari tents with locally sourced materials such as Texas limestone, creating a natural connection between the structures and the land. Outdoor amenities for each tent include wrap-around panoramic decks, and fire pits providing opportunities for guests to gather and relax for evening drinks and outdoor dining.

 

Spacious glamping tents

Spacious glamping tents, sleeping two or four, are sighted on the property to maximize seclusion, and blend seamlessly into the natural landscape. The tents feature a king-size bed, twin and trundle beds with linens, plush robes, and modern furnishings.

The retreat’s tents are also climate-controlled to ensure a comfortable stay year-round. Private ensuite bathrooms feature rain showers and premium bath products from San Saba Soap Company. A fully equipped kitchenette and stocked mini-bar give guests the chance to grill outdoors or mix a cocktail featuring local Garrison Brothers bourbon.

 

The Cafe will offer guests a seasonal menu of light eats featuring local produce served on its deck with panoramic views of the Lyndon B. Johnson State Park. Guests can start the day at the cafe by enjoying fresh Merit coffee, juices, smoothies, and grab-and-go breakfast options. The day winds down with craft cocktails and a curated selection of local wines from Crown Hill Winery and Pedernales Cellars and cold beers from Real Ale Brewing.

A country store will ensure guests have all the provisions guests need for their stay as well as hosting pop-up retail experiences from local brands.

Outdoorsy Hill Country is now accepting reservations. 

For more information, visit outdoorsy.com/hillcountry. 

On a trip to Coastal Mississippi, explore 100KM of the best seafood

Indulge your senses and embark on a delectable journey along the Mississippi Gulf Coast, where culinary creativity meets coastal, southern charm.

From sizzling grills featuring unique seafood combinations to the elegant ambiance of fine dining establishments, Coastal Mississippi has become an epicenter of delight. Across the three vibrant counties along the coast of Mississippi, culinary masters blend local flavors with international flair – creating a symphony of tastes that reflect the region’s distinctive style.

“Across our 62-miles of shorelines, there are many culinary gems including flavors from around the world,” said Judy Young, CEO of Coastal Mississippi Tourism. “From fresh-caught seafood to international cuisine and southern favourites, visitors have an array of options to choose from.”

World class seafood

Nestled on the serene banks of the Jourdan River, Jourdan River Steamer offers an enchanting dining experience, combining vintage elegance with contemporary culinary artistry.

With its panoramic views of the river, guests can indulge in a menu featuring fresh Gulf Coast seafood and other culinary delights, such as Royal Red Shrimp, Snow Crab and more.

Hook Gulf Coast Cuisine portrays culinary excellence on the Gulf Coast, offering a remarkable dining experience that seamlessly blends coastal charm with gourmet innovation. Located in Pass Christian, this restaurant boasts a menu brimming with locally sourced seafood, featuring fresh catch escabeche, pecan crusted mangrove snapper, seared Tuna, and more – all capturing the region’s rich culinary heritage.

Southern favourites

Inside a beautiful replica of an 1820s style historic home featuring salvaged bricks and a grand central chimney, The Chimney’s Restaurant in Gulfport is known for its fresh seafood & steak dinners.

Travellers can gaze upon the lush greenery, majestic oaks, and Gulfport waterfront – all while enjoying an extensive menu of southern comfort favorites and chef specialties.

In Bay St. Louis, travellers can visit The Sycamore House, a pair of 19th-century Acadian cottages on the National Register of Historic Places, for delectable dinner, brunch, and dessert options. Chef’s Stella LeGardeur and Michael Eastham have curated a menu to tempt every guest with dishes like their savory crab meat and mushroom cheesecake.

To plan your perfect Coastal Mississippi culinary escape,
visit coastalmississippi.com to learn more.

This week-long trip in a Rolls Royce through Napa Valley is a must for foodies

Luxury car aficionados and culinary enthusiasts are invited this fall to experience one of North America’s food and wine capitals during a week-long driving journey through Napa Valley.

Announced earlier this year, the complete Four Seasons Drive Experience through Napa Valley itinerary from Oct. 29 to Nov. 4, 2023 is now available to book. Celebrating the romance of road travel, guests will explore Napa Valley via customized routes in one of several luxury and sports cars available for rent, including a Rolls Royce Cullinan, McLaren GT, Lamborghini Aventador S, Ferrari F8 Spider, Bentley Continental, Aston Martin DBX, and a Porsche Taycan to name a few. 

Four Seasons Resort and Residences Napa Valley welcomes guests to a one-of-a-kind wine country resort set within a world-class working vineyard.

Home to Elusa Winery, the property features panoramic views of the surrounding mountains and vineyards, a distinctive indoor-outdoor environment, and the best of grape-to-glass lifestyle when not on the road.

Day 1

Guests will arrive at Four Seasons Resort and Residences Napa Valley and will be treated to a wine tasting at Elusa Winery prior to a welcome dinner at the Resort’s vineyard Barn while being serenaded by the sounds of live acoustic music. Other surprise touches await to take the evening from the magical to the sublime.

Day 2

A scenic drive with ocean views along the California coastline takes guests to Hog Island Oyster Co., where they will indulge in a tasting session while mastering the art of oyster shucking. 

The coastal landscape is contrasted by drives through ancient redwoods followed by a dining experience at Promontory Winery, located in an unmarked territory beyond the southwestern borderlands of Oakville with majestic views of Napa Valley.

Four Seasons Resort and Residences Napa Valley

Day 3

Guests will start their day with breakfast at Auro, Calistoga’s only Michelin-starred dining destination, with the sprawling Palisades Mountains as its backdrop. This is followed by a half-day drive to Chappellet Winery for a private picnic lunch overlooking views of Lake Hennessey.

Chappellet is renowned for producing some of the highest-standard Cabernet Sauvignons and mountain-grown wines and is recognized as one of the great Napa Valley wineries.  Thereafter, guests embark on a lakeside drive towards Cervantes Family Vineyard Ranch, a remote and rugged 1,100-acre (445 hectare) ranch in the far eastern reaches of Napa Valley.

Upon arrival, guests can engage in activities including skeet shooting, horse-riding, and a grape picking experience, followed by an eventful evening of dining, dancing and entertainment and a shuttle service on standby for seamless transfer back to the resort.

Day 4

Guests will first stop for a tour at SingleThread Farm, a 24-acre (10 hectare) working farm located in the heart of Sonoma Wine Country.  The tour includes simple delights such as a flower posy-making experience, followed by an indulgent six-course Michelin-starred lunch at Single Thread Restaurant, exclusive to Drive attendees. 

While at the resort between activities, guests can spend their leisure time indulging in a signature spa treatment at Spa Talisa, exploring the surrounding hiking trails, playing tennis, or lounging by the scenic pool. The journey continues with a wine-tasting tour at Opus One Winery, known for cultivating five traditional Bordeaux grape varieties.

The day winds to a close with a scenic dinner featuring wine pairings and picturesque views.

Auro, Michelin-starred Restaurant at Four Seasons Resort and Residences Napa Valley

Day 5

The day begins with a breathtaking morning drive to San Francisco Bay, where guests will indulge in local Californian cuisine alongside panoramic vistas of the iconic Golden Gate Bridge. An atmospheric journey through the Napa Valley during harvest season follows and concludes with an intimate dining experience at Michelin-starred Auro.

There, guests will be treated to a seasonally inspired, five-course tasting menu by acclaimed Chef Rogelio Garcia and his team.  

Day 6

Around sunrise, guests take to the skies for an early morning hot-air balloon ride for panoramic views of the vineyards and undulating mountains. The final visit among the impressive list of wineries is ADAMVS, renowned for mountain-grown Cabernet Sauvignons and boasting an innovative tasting room and wine library.

Additional tailored experiences include a visit to NBC Pottery for a craft experience, artisanal olive oil tasting at Grove 45, and a gala dinner on a private estate with live music for entertainment.

The USVI’s newest adults-only hotel is a pink Barbie dream house

On July 21, one of the most anticipated movies of this year hit the big screen – Barbie!

And with the iconic doll making her film debut, travellers around the world are looking to experience the pink side of life at spots like Pink Palm Hotel in the U.S. Virgin Islands, a new adults-only boutique hotel where you can soak in all of the pink, dreamy, Barbie vibes.  

This magnificent property opened in March 2023 in the heart of the islands’ capital city Charlotte Amalie on St. Thomas, and features one of the most magical and beautiful views of the city’s waterfront harbor.

The 28-room adult boutique luxury hotel renovates the famed Smith’s Fancy, popular in the 1940s as a destination guesthouse for those in the fashion, art, music, and film worlds. This unique spot offers gorgeous water views that can be enjoyed from many of the rooms and the poolside common area.

Pink Palm offers guests a relaxing, private oasis while being steps from local restaurants, bars, art galleries and St. Thomas’s famous shops. This exotic place offers guests a full-service cocktail bar, highly skilled bartenders & cocktail servers.    

Discover Utah’s dark skies and starry nights

Utah — which prides itself on easily enabling tourists to enjoy star power in the truest sense — is now eagerly promoting a temporary disruption of celestial rays.

A state that is home to more internationally accredited dark sky parks and places than anywhere else on the planet — 24 at last count — will offer prime locations to view the Great American Solar Eclipse on Oct. 14. The eclipse will pass over several national parks and monuments in Utah, creating distinctive viewing locations, such as from the famed hoodoos at Bryce Canyon National Park and  through an arch at National Bridges National Monument – the world’s first Dark Sky park.

“It’s a full total eclipse so it should be quite phenomenal,” Rachel Bremer of the Utah Office of Tourism said during a recent Toronto event. “For eclipse enthusiasts, this is a big deal. People from all over the world travel to see this kind of thing.”

Hotel lodging will now be hard to come by in prime viewing locales for the actual eclipse but other accommodation options will be available, with some homeowners in those areas turning their homes into temporary AirBNB dwellings.

A Dark Sky venue

Utah has been enthusiastically promoting itself as a great Dark Sky venue, with Bremer stating that a combination of altitude, dry air and a somewhat smallish population of around 3 million people — resulting in little light pollution — enables visitors to easily spot star-studded nighttime skies, views that are denied to many people in other parts of the world.

“To be able to walk out of your hotel and see stars is pretty unique for many,” she said during the Toronto visit, billed as a Utah Star Party and which coincided with International Dark Sky Week.

The Utah delegation then continued to Calgary and Vancouver.

Utah tourism authorities are determined to help others see the constellations, with the Canadian tour not going the common route of giving event attendees gift bags, instead donating money that would have been spent on the swag to The International Dark Sky Association and the Royal Astronomical Society of Canada.

Bremer acknowledges that promoting the eclipse is a “little bit of the opposite” from her office’s more traditional Dark Sky tourism. “It’s kind of cool.”

More stars in Moab

Melissa Stocks of Grand County Economic Development, which includes the city of Moab, noted her area is among destinations that can leave visitors somewhat star-struck, thanks to regional parks.

“The parks and monuments of southeastern Utah share some of the darkest skies remaining in the contiguous 48 United States,” tourism authorities state. “In recent years, three of Moab’s most popular parks — Arches National Park, Canyonlands National Park, and Dead Horse Point State Park — have been recognized as International Dark Sky Parks. Park staff routinely provide programs celebrating the night sky, from walks under the full moon to gazing through telescopes at objects millions of light-years away.”

For more information visit: discovermoab.com/moab-night-skies .

Visit Cedar Valley

Becki Lewis of Visit Cedar City — found 250 miles south of Salt Lake City — in turn said that culturally inclined sorts can do some star-gazing while in Cedar City, home to the annual Utah Shakespeare Festival, which dates back to 1962 and this year starts in June and continues into October.

Three theatres are used for it, including a “replica of a replica of the Globe” theatre in London in which Shakespeare’s plays were first performed. That roof-less Cedar City theatre provides sightings of starry skies to those taking in nighttime performances, Lewis said.

More information about the festival can be found at bard.org.

Lewis added that Utah has plenty of venues for people to enjoy nature.

“Most of the state parks would be national parks in other states,” she said. “They’re just beautiful.”

See Salt Lake City

Meanwhile, Ryan Mack of Visit Salt Lake said those visiting Salt Lake City can get up close and personal with some of the same terrain as athletes who competed in the 2002 Salt Lake City Winter Olympics did.

That includes both downhill and cross-country ski trails used for races.

“They (alpine trails that hosted races) won’t have the gates but they’ll be the same runs,” Mack said.

Skating and curling classes are available in the facility that hosted skating and curling competitions.

Mack said Salt Lake City’s successful staging of the Olympics boosted its tourism trade.

“In a lot of ways, it put Salt Lake on the international map as an outdoors destination,” he said.

Salt Lake City is expected to again host the Winter Olympics in 2030 or 2034, with strong community support, Mack added.

More information can be found at visitsaltlake.com.

Hard Rock opening massive casino in Deadwood, South Dakota

Hard Rock International is bringing its unique brand of world-class entertainment to the historic city of Deadwood in the heart of the Black Hills National Forest. The Rocksino by Hard Rock project will celebrate a grand opening on Aug. 8.

Hard Rock International executives, local community members and civic leaders will participate in the celebration of the newest economic driver in the region most famous for its gold rush history.

The Rocksino by Hard Rock Deadwood is a boutique hotel & casino experience, which includes most of what fans of the Hard Rock brand have come to know but on a smaller scale than its famous integrated resorts in gateway international cities.

Currently, the property is seeking several positions for its workforce including Administrative Assistant, Hospitality Manager, Executive Chef, all department supervisors including food and beverage, casino, and kitchen, public area attendants, housekeeping, bartenders, kitchen staff, and retail sales associates.

The property will feature a casino including 86 new slot machines, full-service restaurant and bar with amazing craft cocktails, and a delicious new menu that will include everyone’s most loved pizza in Deadwood which will be prepared in our brand-new state-of-the-art kitchen.

Diners can enjoy their meals on the Historic Patio, which will feature a wood fire grill, or inside at the bar or VIP mezzanine. Shop at the Rock Shop Retail Store for custom Rocksino by Hard Rock Deadwood apparel. Beautifully renovated luxury guest rooms are scheduled to open later this year.

1 Hotels opens flagship property in Hawaii

1 Hotels recently announced the opening of 1 Hotel Hanalei Bay, its flagship nature-and-wellness-focused island oasis overlooking a storied stretch of Kauai’s North Shore.

Indigenous and endemic vines and plants weave through low-impact structures that blend softly and seamlessly into their surroundings, causing the hotel to virtually vanish into its cliffside site.

The lobby, reception, and open-air entranceway lead guests on a journey deep into Hawaiian history and mythology. Much of the original building was removed and replaced with streams and gardens. Reclaimed teak joists, puka lava stone walls and ceilings hand-woven from abacá, a natural leaf fiber harvested from a cousin of the banana tree, are locally sourced.

Rooms and suites

There are 252 airy and nature-inspired rooms, including 51 suites decorated with hand-woven floors fashioned from local black basalt, reclaimed teak and abaca furniture and traditional punai daybeds.

Three spacious signature suites – the two-story Puu Poa Ocean Loft Suite, Napali House Suite and Makana Penthouse — serve stunning ocean and majestic mountain views from private terraces.

Every interior detail lends texture framing panoramic vistas – visible through oversized openable windows – of the shimmering crescent-shaped Bay. 

Other features

1 Hotel Hanalei Bay is also home to:

  • an 18,000-square-foot Bamford Wellness Sp
  • a 10,000 square-foot Anatomy fitness centre with 24/7 cardio equipment and strength training, mind & movement group classes, a dedicated spin/all function room and personal athletic performance training and body sculpting 
  • seven sustainable food venues that honour the rich local culture and centuries of Hawaiian tradition
  • a wide range of traditional athletic activities including an 18-hole Championship Mauka Disc Golf Course 
  • three saline pools

For more information, visit 1hotels.com 

Why South Dakota’s Badlands are a haven for wildlife

South Dakota’s Badlands National Park is in fact good lands for wildlife enthusiasts.

The 244,000-acre park — described as a “maze of buttes, canyons, pinnacles and spires” — is home to bison, bighorn sheep, pronghorn antelope, coyotes, eagles and other creatures, while scientific work has determined that the area long ago served once as a home for the likes of three-toed horses, sabre-tooth tigers and dog-sized camels, says Katlyn Svendsen of the South Dakota Department of Tourism.

Lodging is available in the park, and visitors also can camp in a region that Svendsen says appears somewhat outer-worldly.

“It’s like you landed on the moon,” she says of the unusual terrain.

Those visiting South Dakota will have other opportunities to see wildlife, with for instance, 71,000-ace Custer State Park home to 1,300 free-roaming bison and other wildlife, with its Wildlife Loop Scenic Byway among outdoor adventure opportunities. The Custer State Park Bison Center tells the story of the bison herd and educates people on the importance of the large mammals through “engaging and dynamic interactive displays.”

South Dakota has 6 U.S. National Park Service sites, while the South Dakota State Park system features 56 state parks and recreation areas that “showcase the state’s broad expanse of hiking trails, prairies, back-country mountains, pristine lakes, vast rivers and lush woods.”

Wide-open areas and a smallish population prompts Svendsen’s colleague Alexa Dorn to declare that visitors will find plenty of nature. “If you need room to roam you have room to roam.”

Svendsen also praises her state’s cultural and historic side, with South Dakota being home to 9 Native American tribes. Tourists can go on tours that will familiarize them with Native culture, including ones offered by Tatanka Tours, a Native-owned firm that takes visitors “on an odyssey into the realm of Lakota (Sioux) country. You will have a clearer and deeper understanding of rich Lakota culture and history.”

As well, the Crazy Horse Memorial — which depicts legendary Native leader Crazy Horse and is the largest in-progress mountain carving in the world — is also home to the Indian Museum of North America, a collection of artifacts reflecting “the diverse histories and cultures of over 300 Native nations.”

South Dakota’s prime attraction is Mount Rushmore National Monument, which features 60-foot faces of four famed American presidents carved from stone and offers a walking trail, museums, a gift shop and dining hall.

Another state highlight is the smallish town of Deadwood, which Dorn reports was a “rough and tough cowboy town” that dates back to the 1870s when gold was discovered in the region.

Deadwood today is the only municipality in South Dakota that allows gambling and has numerous casinos, prompting Svendsen to compare it to a “mini-Las Vegas.”

The money the casinos take in is reinvested in the community.

Such famed characters from Western U.S. history as Wild Bill Hickok and Calamity Jane are buried in a Deadwood cemetery, which itself has become a tourist attraction.

Historical re-enactments await Deadwood visitors

Deadwood’s lively past is also reflected in a brothel museum, itself a one-time brothel and which tells the story of the brothels that once flourished in the community.

Meanwhile, Svendsen says South Dakota’s location should make it particularly attractive to Prairie residents, adding Winnipeg residents can reach the state in around six hours by car.

More information is available at travelsouthdakota.com.

—STORY BY IAN STALKER